BANGKOK — As virtual reality becomes available to the masses, a group of Bangkok designers wants to answer the technology’s promise by using it for a form of communal art-therapy.

Visual design firm Eyedropper Fill wants to embrace the transhuman future with abundant humanity with “Dreamscape II,” in which participants would imagine a more ideal world using virtual reality’s immersive, sensory experience.

“We are taught to believe in ‘impossibility.’ But in fact, we’re all able to construct our own dreams,” Creative Director Wattanapume “Best” Laisuwanchai said. “By turning dreams into reality, our imaginations won’t be suppressed; we’ll be empowered.”

By weaving technology and art, Dreamscape II would fuse imagination with reality. The team, which is seeking crowdfunding, will interview people from the slums to the heights, then art therapists would help them express their ideas of a dream city on a shared, circular canvas.

 

The resulting mandala paintings would then be rendered into virtual reality environments for VR platforms.

“Dreamscape II is not only a collaboration between communities and our team, but also a collaboration among creators from different fields whose knowledge and experience will be exchanged,” Best said.

If the Dreamscape Project II gains enough funding, they plan to show all the visuals at an exhibition which could be Thailand’s first VR exhibition.

“Visitors will have an opportunity to exchange opinions on how we could change our society. Also, we would like the government sectors to join so that they can hear the unheard opinions from real people,” Best said.

Eyedropper Fill’s creative director Wattanapume “Best” Laisuwanchai and producer Nuntawat "Nut" Jarusruangnil with a mandala. Photo: Asiola / Courtesy
Eyedropper Fill’s creative director Wattanapume “Best” Laisuwanchai and producer Nuntawat “Nut” Jarusruangnil with a mandala. Photo: Asiola / Courtesy

The team needs 800,000 baht to realize the full project, but they have started crowdfunding with a more modest target of 300,000 baht to begin the first phase.

Supporters will be credited and get cool merch such as a documentary DVD, tote bag, booklet and even their own personal VR dreamworld.

The Dreamscape project began in 2015 with “Intimate Politik,” an exhibition at Speedy Grandma where people were asked to draw their dreams on paper to be beamed onto walls and streets via projectors. A documentary on the project won awards at the 19th annual Thai Short Film & Video Festival in 2015.

 

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